Teach us how to see (on Mary at the feet of Christ)

Teach us how to see (on Mary at the feet of Christ)

Mary stands in as symbol of all who sit at the feet of the Lord, all who follow as his disciples - all who seek to look to Christ for the one thing needed. All of us are invited to see much more than appears - all of us are encouraged to wait expectantly for something to burst forth from our Messiah, shedding new light on the landscape. And so we all look to Christ to see into the depths of reality, to glimpse the light and life of the world, to experience the fullness of God dwelling in man, to see the Lord of time who bridges the past into the now and makes possible our future, to see the one who at the consummation of the age will bring all out of their graves and wipe away all the tears of old as we enter the new heaven and new earth. By being present (attentive and expectant) in our relationship with Christ, we find ourselves where he is: in the depths of the non-intermittent, dependable, loving relationship of the Triune God; “the heart of discipleship is bound up with the life of the Trinity” (Williams). 


But we also find ourselves where Jesus is in another way. By looking to the face of Christ we are also taught to become aware of where and who he is with. The attentiveness we pay to Jesus, like Mary sitting at his feet, is not just a kind of aesthetic attitude while the important work takes place in the backrooms. Like walking out of a gallery we will be moved to find ourselves in the corners and circles of the world where Christ is pleased to be Emmanuel. Looking to Jesus teaches us to see him in our world today - sitting on street corners asking for change, stranded on Manus waiting on mercy, frightened in a youth detention centre isolated and abused. 

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On Shattering My Unhealthy Obsession with Perfect Decisions

On Shattering My Unhealthy Obsession with Perfect Decisions

The much awaited second guest post by Heather Miller

"For so long I have confronted decisions with an unhealthy intensity, hoping to catch the goodness of God by making the “right” one. But the goodness of God is not scarce. It is not a rare jewel to be seized and tucked away in a secure place, under lock and key, for fear of losing the advantage. His favour is not won through excellent and untainted decision-making."

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Violence, Babylon, and The Boss

Violence, Babylon, and The Boss

If I had me a gun, I’d find the bastards and shoot them on sight, I’m a jack of all trades, we’ll be alright… 

Bruce Springsteen, Jack of All Trades, Wrecking Ball (2013)

O daughter Babylon, you devastator! Happy shall they be who pay you back what you have done to us! Happy shall they be who take your little ones and dash them against the rock!  

Psalm 137:8-9

Ps 137 has much to contribute to both corporate and personal worship and piety. And from what we see in lyrics such as Springsteen’s, where the church has shied away from the raw ‘unattractive’ emotions of these psalms, secular art has maintained the tradition of use, and provides a stunning case for their power and importance.

[You can find a talk based on this post here: Psalm 137: Anger & Non-violence ]

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