Outside In

Outside In

Is Christianity just another Inside/Outside division? Is it the only one? Is the the dissolution of all such boundary markers? Is this post solely questions? Not solely, no. 

"Does not Christianity revolve around the outsider, the wholly other? Because Christ, who being in very nature of God (eternally inside), did not consider being inside with God something to be used to his advantage and instead made himself nothing, took himself outside, by taking the very nature of a servant, and remained committed to the outside, even to the point of death on a cross (Phil 2:4-8, loose translation)."
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Faith, Love, Hope - Characteristic Postmodern Virtues

Faith, Love, Hope - Characteristic Postmodern Virtues

Notes from a workshop I ran as part of a series on the relationship/interplay between Deconstruction and Christianity for my work with the Chaplaincy at Mac Uni. This was the opening session, introducing a number of the concepts and exploring faith, hope, and love as "unconditional" (undeconstructable) compared to their "conditioned" (constructed) counterparts belief, expectation, reciprocity.

"That is a hope I hold, but that hope might be dashed, it might not be realised – that is why it is hope and not expectation, I’m hoping in a possibility… and I believe that this is the kind of hope that we as Christians are called to have..."
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The Incompleteness of Christianity

The Incompleteness of Christianity

Despite our desire to be in control, to experience things with a sense of completion (of being all tied off, done and dusted, sorted and settled) Christianity is a way of being in the world that promotes and indeed requires things to be incomplete. Faith, hope, love, forgiveness, hospitality; these Christian virtues all operate by disturbing cycles/economies of completion... leaving things to lie unfinished and incomplete.

"Christianity revels in incompleteness. In disturbing, disrupting, and breaking cycles of completion. In refusing to let cycles continue on ad infinitum. The characteristically Christian virtues not only promote, they require, things remaining incomplete."
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The Ghost of Grace: A Christmas Carol, Tillich, Caputo

The Ghost of Grace: A Christmas Carol, Tillich, Caputo

In A Christmas Carol, Scrooge receives three ghostly visitations awakening him to the separation that exists within himself (and and between he and others). Grace has a similar ghostly quality, it haunts and it spooks - provoking us out of our apathy with a call beyond ourselves.

Image: The Muppet Christmas Carol

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Jesus the trump card

Jesus the trump card

An extended reflection in two parts 1) why, despite the move away from Christianity and the church's diminishing public influence, do people continue to employ Jesus as an argument in political and cultural debates. 2) With that background in mind, what positive claims about Jesus can we contribute to these discussions (in an attempt to save Jesus from becoming just another trump card).

Image from Pinterest

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Things I Learnt Watching The West Wing

Things I Learnt Watching The West Wing

Heather and I just finished watching all 7 seasons of The West Wing. To mark this achievement I have decided to share 7 lessons I have learnt from this magnificent show. Lessons include the company you keep, the benefits of a spouse, and the use of props when thinking.

And even if you don't like the lessons, I think I've collected a pretty great assortment of clips, enjoy!

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Proposing a Theological Task

Proposing a Theological Task

I was recently trying to address to a question about how to nurture and create "effective and contextual mission and ministry practices". In thinking about how to respond to this, I began to think about how to respond to the question of the theological task; i.e. what is the task of theology in both communities of practice and the broader culture?

This post is an attempt at forming a helpful proposal.

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